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Thu, 26 Jul 2018

HP4 Race - The Ultimate Superbike

"BMW HP4 Race is the ultimate superbike" Rich Taylor, GQ Magazine. 

The BMW HP4 Race is more than the sum of its parts. This bike is pure emotion. From the development right up to the racetrack, passion is what has made this race bike what it is. An innovation driver, designed to push the limits. The HP bike is the first motorcycle in the world to offer a fully carbon frame and fully carbon wheels. With 158 kW (215 HP) of power, it weighs just 146 kilos (dry weight). A handmade dream come true for 750 enthusiasts.

We get so many of our customers asking about this stunning race bike and wanting a slice of the action so when we saw this review from GQ magazine we knew you would be interested.

“When an invitation landed from BMW to ride the HP4 Race at Circuito de Almeria, at GQ we knew that it wasn't an invitation that could be passed up. It was a ticket to ride possibly the finest production motorcycle ever made, to sample almost-unobtanium hardware taken straight out of the MotoGP and World Superbike paddocks and to experience something that had the potential to completely recalibrate our definition of a superbike. It wasn't a case of working out if it would overtake superbike status and go straight to ultrabike, but an exercise in contemplating if it was even possible for it not to. Forget Ducati's 1299 Superleggera. Forget Aprilia's RSV4 RF. Yamaha's R1M and Honda's Fireblade SP don't even get a look in. As the name suggests, the BMW HP4 Race is a race bike. Not a "race" bike; a £68,000 race bike.

If you're not familiar with BMW's HP4 Race then it needs a little explanation. From a few yards it could easily be mistaken for a S 1000 RR in race fairings, but the similarities end right there. Everything else is completely different, right the way from the frame to the seat to the engine and electronics. And, take note: it is not to be confused with the road-going S 1000 RR HP4.

Peel back the fully carbon fibre fairings and you'll find a single-piece carbon fibre frame. Carbon frames are nothing new - indeed Ducati first used a carbon frame on its GP9 MotoGP bike in 2009 - but they are extremely rare on production motorcycles, and the difference here is this is mass-produced rather than limited-production carbon fibre. The frame weighs just 7.8kg, a staggering 4kg lighter than the standard aluminium frame in the S 1000 RR. BMW says that each carbon frame it produces is within 0.4 per cent of the torsion and flexibility of any other and that it can engineer the carbon to behave any way it likes, just as it can with its traditional aluminium frames.”

Read the full article here